SALSA 2000




 




Texas Linguistic Forum Vol. 44, No. 1.
(2002) Austin: Texas Linguistic Forum.
Ritsuko Kataoka, Cassandra Moore, and Katherine Zilkha, eds.



TABLE OF CONTENTS


Allwood, Jens
Cooperation and Flexibility in Multimodal Communication
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Baran, Dominika
The Role of Russian Function Words in Urban Colloquial Uzbek
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Cashman, Holly R.
Constructing a Bilingual Identity: Conversation Analysis of Spanish/English Language Use in a Television Interview
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Ciscel, Matthew H., Richard W. Hallett, and Angie Green
Language Attitude and Identity in the European Republics of the Former Soviet Union
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Clark, John T.
How White Hegemonic English Reproduces Racial and Gender Hierarchies
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Davies, Catherine Evans
Martha Stewart’s Linguistic Presentation of Self
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Kang, Yoonhee
Addressing the Invisible World: Indexicality, Iconicity, and the Cultural Concept of Self in Belian, a Petalangan Healing Ritual in Indonesia
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Moses, Rae E.
The Discourse of Pharmaceutical Ads
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Plourde, Eric
The Dubbing of The Simpsons: Cultural Appropriation, Discursive Manipulation and Divergencies
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Sherzer, Joel
Language and Ecology: The View from the Kuna Indians of Panama
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Snow, Peter
Language Variation in Caribbean Creole/Non-Lexifier Contact Situations: Continua or Diglossia?
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Sun, Hao
Framing Interactions and Defining Relationships: Phatic Talk in Chinese Telephone Conversations
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Tetreault, Chantal
"Tom-boy talk," Girls from the 'Cité', and the Limits to Gender as Performance
AbstractArticle (PDF)

Yamaji, Harumi 
Addressee-Oriented Nature of Referent Honorifics in Japanese Conversation
AbstractArticle (PDF)


Allwood, Jens
Cooperation and Flexibility in Multimodal Communication

This paper discusses cooperation in communication, with a view to future cooperative human-computer interfaces. First, cooperation and multimodal communication are defined and characterized. It is then proposed that cooperation can be extended into a notion of "mutual flexibility" and this notion is subsequently characterized. In a following section, an empirical study of how verbal and nonverbal gestural means are used to achieve flexibility are presented. Finally, some possible implications for the design of future interactive systems are mentioned.

Baran, Dominika
The Role of Russian Function Words in Urban Colloquial Uzbek

Although a number of scholars researching language contact have pointed out the borrowing of core vocabulary including function words and discourse markers (Bernsten 1990; Campbell 1987; Higa 1979; Mougeon & Beniak 1990; Mougeon 1998; Myers-Scotton 1993; Scotton & Okeju 1973), the exact role of these loans in the borrowing language has not been studied in great detail. In this paper I present data from the virtually unresearched language contact setting of Russian and Uzbek in Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan. I discuss Russian function words found in colloquial speech of Tashkent residents. I show that these loans have acquired a status distinct from any of their Uzbek equivalents: an affective function of expressing emphasis. I also argue that Russian function words belong to the informal register of Uzbek, and as such are likely to remain unaffected by current language reform.


Cashman, Holly R.
Constructing a Bilingual Identity: Conversation Analysis
of Spanish/English Language Use in a Television Interview

In this paper, I analyze an interaction between two Spanish/English bilinguals in a public setting: a television talk show interview on Telemundo, a Spanish language network in the United States. Using the framework of conversation analysis, I investigate how the two speakers actively attempt to create a bilingual identity through language use, and how their attempts are either ratified or undermined by their interlocutor. In addition, I examine the significance of the interaction within the greater context of bilingualism, Spanish in the U.S. and inter-Latino interaction in the United States.


Ciscel, Matthew H., Richard W. Hallett, and Angie Green
Language Attitude and Identity in the European Republics of the Former Soviet Union

This study investigates language attitude and cultural identity within the national contexts in three European republics of the former Soviet Union: Lithuania, Ukraine, and Moldova. Results of a questionnaire given to two hundred subjects indicate that the cultural and historical differences among these republics have significantly affected the language attitudes of speakers in the three contexts.


Clark, John T.
How White Hegemonic English Reproduces Racial and Gender Hierarchies
This paper shows how a local linguistic practice, which I call indexing the underspecified center, directly constitutes, reproduces and conceals racial and gender hierarchies by tapping into interlocutors' uncritically examined, hegemonic ideologies about what kind of social identities occupy the unmarked, rhetorical "center" in North American society.


Davies, Catherine Evans
Martha Stewart’s Linguistic Presentation of Self

Gendered use of language by mass media celebrities potentially both reflects sociolinguistic patterns and influences language change. Martha Stewart is a complex figure who has become a powerful corporate executive through representing the traditional woman's role of homemaker and commodifying her vision of upper-middle-class "good taste." Martha Stewart's linguistic presentation of self on her television show is analyzed in terms of three interrelated frames: politeness, credibility, and authenticity. Her language use is discussed in relation to scholarship on gender and language, and her potential for motivating language change is considered, as well as appropriate methodology for measuring any such influence.


Kang, Yoonhee
Addressing the Invisible World: Indexicality, Iconicity, and the Cultural Concept of Self in Belian, a Petalangan Healing Ritual in Indonesia

This paper analyzes a performance of the Belian, a shamanic healing ritual practiced by the Petalangan people in Indonesia to discuss the tensions between situatedness (contingency) and transcendence (analogy) of ritual speech. I analyze the usage of address and referential terms and personal pronouns, by which a shaman mediates the present context and the supernatural world during the performance. My concerns focus on the interrelations between indexicality and iconicity of the Belian performance and the importance of the Petalangan concept of the 'relational' self, which mediates 'contextualization' and 'entextualization' processes of the ritual.


Moses, Rae E.
The Discourse of Pharmaceutical Ads

This paper describes the form and structure of the discourse of print media pharmaceutical advertisements. The study is based on the analysis of fifty eight ads from popular magazines for thirty-four different This paper describes the form and structure of the discourse of media pharmaceutical advertisements. The study is based on the analysis of 58 ads from the popular press. I argue that these ads are a new marketing genre that is shaped by the regulations of the Food and Drug Administration and is modulated by the audience and context for each ad. I provide a description of the genre and show how gender and the nature of the malady to be treated trigger different discourse patterns. Further, I show the influence of governmental regulations and how they mediate doctor/patient communication.


Plourde, Eric
The Dubbing of The Simpsons: Cultural Appropriation, Discursive Manipulation and Divergencies

Analysis of the dubbing of The Simpsons offers insights into possible differences in discursive identity between France and Québec, two cultures that share a common language. Translations done in France and in Québec (a province of Canada and enclave of the French-speaking population in North America) for The Simpsons show various strategies of cultural appropriation, especially concerning elements considered intrusive by the target culture. The series is perceived as a children's show and the subversive discourse of the original is toned down accordingly. Dubbing stands as a buffer zone between two cultures and is also a potent tool for lingustic standardization.


Sherzer, Joel
Language and Ecology: The View from the Kuna Indians of Panama

This paper explores various ways in which the Kuna language is related to the Kuna natural environment. It will examine words for animals and plants, the organization of words into semantic systems, variation in the use of these words, and the use of the language of ecology in Kuna speaking practices. While not about language endangerment per se, to the degree that Kuna ecology is in danger, the language that is intimately related to ecology is also in danger.


Snow, Peter
Language Variation in Caribbean Creole/Non-Lexifier Contact Situations: Continua or Diglossia?

This paper surveys those Caribbean creoles in contact with non-lexically related national languages and discusses why the post-creole continuum model may be inappropriate for explanations of contact-induced language variation and change in this type of speech community. A consideration of the language contact between the Englishbased creole spoken on the Panamanian island of Bastimentos and the national language of Spanish suggests the relatively stable coexistence of two discrete systems where diglossia obtains. A discrete diglossic model is proposed as a provisional alternative for studies of language variation on the island of Bastimentos and in other stable Caribbean creole/non-lexifier contact situations.


Sun, Hao
Framing Interactions and Defining Relationships: Phatic Talk in Chinese Telephone Conversations

This article discusses forms and functions of phatic talk occurring in the opening phase of Chinese telephone conversations between female participants, utilizing naturalistic data. Context- and addressee-sensitive phatic talk in Chinese defines relations, frames interactions, and indexes multiple contextual factors. It will also be demonstrated how phatic strategies may interact with discourse sequence, ratifying and restructuring the organization of conversation to display speakers' local concerns in particular discourse contexts.


Tetreault, Chantal
"Tom-boy talk," Girls from the 'Cité', and the Limits to Gender as Performance

This paper analyzes girls' use of competitive verbal performances, slang, and ritualized insults that are associated with masculinity in the stigmatized space of a French cité, or low-income housing project. In addition to girls' strategic use of these verbal performances, this paper addresses the conflicting ideologies surrounding girls' use of masculine-styled language and stereotypically masculine behavior. The paper thus investigates how processes of language and gender socialization among adolescents are contingent upon local prescriptions for gender roles and language use.


Yamaji, Harumi 
Addressee-Oriented Nature of Referent Honorifics in Japanese Conversation

This study investigates Japanese referent honorifics in reference to socially distant third parties. Thirteen conversations between native speakers reveal that such honorifics are rarely used. Additionally, the addressee-oriented nature of Japanese honorifics is proposed, based on a correlation between addressee honorifics and referent honorifics, suggesting interdependent nature of these honorifics. Another observation made in this study is that stylemixing between referent honorifics and non-honorific forms in reference to an individual might be triggered by changes in the speaker's attitudes toward the referent.