Schedule 2017

Language Contact and Multilingualism

8:45am Registration opens—CLA 1.302C

  9:15-9:25am Opening Remarks—CLA 1.302B

  9:30-10:50am Session 1: Media

Elianna GreenbergGeorgetown University

An Analysis of Creole Usages in Modern Music & A Criticism of Institutionalized Sociolinguistics

Len BekéUniversity of New Mexico

Ajina ej how I hablar, no? Nuevomexicano bilingual predication constructions and the ideologization of talking Norte in the comedic performance of Carlos Medina

James SlottaUniversity of Texas at Austin

The annotated Donald Trump: From speaking with names to living in bubbles

 

11:00-11:50am Keynote address

Dr. Jurgen StreeckUniversity of Texas at Austin

  11:55am-12:55pm Lunch (On your own)

  1:00-2:40pm Session 2: Language Ideologies

Shane LiefTulane University

           

Stefan EngelbergInstitute for the German Language (Mannheim) & University of Mannheim

Changes in language ideology in times of German colonialism

Thea WilliamsonUniversity of Texas at Austin

English Only? Language ideology and policy in an urban secondary school

Aisulu RaspayevaGeorgetown  University

Polycentricity of Linguistic Landscape: The case study of a northern town in Kazakhstan

  2:50-4:30pm Session 3: Multilingualism

Dena AfrasiabiUniversity of Texas at Austin

            Two-Veined: Language Contact and the Body in Transnational Iranian Spaces

Isaac MuhandoTulane University

Understanding Structural Re-alignment and Convergence in a Mixed Language: The case of Sheng

Masha KhachaturyanUniversity of California, Berkeley

(Ecclesiastic) translation as a type of language contact and its linguistic consequences

Anna BelewUniversity of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Investigating multilingualism in an endangered-language context: the case of Iyasa in Cameroon

  4:40-5:30pm Keynote address

Dr. Almeida Jacqueline ToribioUniversity of Texas at Austin

A quantitative approach to multilingual corpora

  7:30pm Reception

Butterfly Bar—2307 Manor Rd

 


 

Saturday: April 15, 2017

9:00am Breakfast—CLA 1.302B

9:30-10:50am Session 4: Language Contact

Julia FineUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

Persistence of prosodic patterning in borrowed conjunctions: The case of staupi and pet'am

Lindsay MorroneUniversity of New Mexico

            A Sociophonetic Analysis of an Albuquerque Drag Queen

Navdeep SokheyUniversity of Texas at Austin

            The Bahraini Chicken Nuggets: Labializing Global and Local Identities

  11:00-11:50am Keynote address

Dr. Na’ama Pat-elUniversity of Texas at Austin

Hebrew and Aramaic: siblings, neighbors, authorities

  11:55am-12:55pm Lunch (On your own)

  1:00-2:40pm Session 5: Identity

Aris ClemonsUniversity of Texas at Austin

            Spanish Use in ‘English-Only’ Contexts

Guadalupe Del Rosario BarrientosUniversity of Texas at Austin

Ni de aqui, ni de alla: Chicana Language and Identity in a Primarily White Institution

Mark VisonàGeorgetown University

            Language Attitudes and Linguistic Landscapes of Malawi

Yeon-ju BaeUniversity of Michigan

“That Non-duality Feels Like Unknowing”: Shifting Authority and Gesturing De-authority in a Korean Zen Translation

  2:50-4:30pm Session 6: Power and Policies

Mary Kate KellyTulane University

            The Scribe’s Hand Betrays His Tongue: Diglossia among the ancient Maya

Anthony K. WebsterUniversity of Texas at Austin

            Why Tséhootsooí does not equal Kit Carson Dr.: On the poetics and politics of

Navajo place-names

Rodney C. JubiladoUniversity of Hawaii at Hilo

            Language Situation and Migration of the Filipinos in Hawaii

Gregory D. S. Anderson and Bikram JoraLiving Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages

Internal neo-colonialism, “development” and the languages of “primitive tribals” in Jharkhand and Odisha states, India

 

4:40-5:30pm Keynote address

Dr. Lyle CampbellUniversity of Hawai’i Manoa

Language Contact and Language Documentation: Whence and Whither?

Biographies


Keynotes:

Dr. Lyle CampbellUniversity of Hawai’i Manoa

Lyle Campbell (PhD UCLA), Linguistics, University of Hawai‘i Mānoa, has held joint appointments in Linguistics, Anthropology, Behavioral Research, Latin American Studies, and Spanish; he has been visiting professor at universities in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Finland, Germany, Mexico, and Spain. He has published 21 books and c.200 articles, and is on 18 editorial boards. He has had numerous grants and awards, including NSF (14 grants); NEH; Humboldt Stiftung; Fulbright Fellowship; Fellow of the Linguistic Society of America; Collitz Professorship (LSA Linguistic Institute); University of Canterbury Research Medal. He won the LSA’s “Leonard Bloomfield Book Award” twice, for American Indian Languages (1997, Oxford University Press) and Historical Syntax in Cross-linguistics Perspective (1995, Alice Harris & Lyle Campbell, Cambridge University Press). He is co-founder of the Catalogue of Endangered Languages (endangeredlanguages.com). His specializations are: historical linguistics, language documentation, indigenous languages of the Americas, typology, and Uralic languages. He grew up in rural Oregon.

 

Dr. Na’ama Pat-elUniversity of Texas at Austin

Na’ama Pat-El is a linguist specilizing in ancient Semitic languages, language contact, and historical syntax. She holds advanced degrees in Linguistics and Semitic Philology from the Hebrew University and Harvard University and is currently an associate professor of Semitic languages and linguistics at the University of Texas, Austin. She has published on contact between Aramaic and Hebrew, Comparative Semitic lingusitics, Subgrouping and syntactic change. Her monograph “Studies in the Historical Syntax of Aramaic” (Gorgias, 2012) touches on aspects of syntactic change during three millennia. She is currently editing a volume on the Semitic languages (Routledge) with John Huehnergard. 

 

Dr. Jurgen StreeckUniversity of Texas at Austin

Dr. Jürgen Streeck (Ph.D. F.U. Berlin, 1981) conducts video-based research on human interaction in everyday life. He has conducted fieldwork in Germany, Southeast Asia, and the U.S. Streeck is particularly interested in language and the body as media of interaction and cognition and in the cultural and experiential foundations of language and meaning. His book Gesturecraft—The Manu-facture of Meaning (2009) is a comprehensive study of the ways in which we use hand gestures to understand the world together and organize talk, work, and social contexts. Among the questions it addresses are how we make sense of things by creating visual and bodily representations of them and how we think with our hands. Streeck is co-editor, with Charles Goodwin and Curtis LeBaron, of a book on multimodal interaction, to be published by Cambridge University Press, and editor of New Adventures in Language and Interaction (Benjamins, forthcoming). In addition to his research on everyday interaction, Streeck is keenly interested in art and music, has published on ways in which painters analyze embodied communication, and studies how rappers have re-invented language and a new community, the ‘hip-hop nation’, has evolved from new ways of using languages.

 

Dr. Almeida Jacqueline ToribioUniversity of Texas at Austin

Almeida Jacqueline Toribio, a native of the Dominican Republic, earned an M.A. in Linguistics & Cognitive Science from Brandeis University and a Ph.D. in Linguistics from Cornell University. She currently serves as Professor in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese at The University of Texas. Professor Toribio’s dossier reflects scholarship in the areas of language contact and variation and a trajectory from theoretical to more empirically-based approaches. She is recognized for her research on code-switching, addressing morpho-syntactic, phonetic, and discursive-pragmatic mixing patterns among diverse multilingual populations. She co-directs, with Professor Barbara Bullock, the Bilingual Annotation Tasks research group, a cohort from the humanities and natural sciences which seeks to bring NLP tools to the analysis of mixed-language texts. A second line of research, pursued over several decades, examines the speech of residents of rural regions of the Dominican Republic and their compatriots in the U.S. That research records the incidence and dissemination of linguistic properties that serve important functions as indices of ethnicity, race, gender, among other social variables. Professor Toribio’s individual and collaborative research has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, The Russel Sage Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation, among others, and the findings appear in The International Journal of the Sociology of Language, Bilingualism: Language & Cognition, Social Science Quarterly, International Journal of Bilingualism, Lingua, andLinguistic Inquiry, among others.

 

 

Presenters:

Dena AfrasiabiUniversity of Texas at Austin

            Dena Afrasiabi received her Ph.D. in Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures from UT Austin in May of 2016. Her research interests include language ideologies, mocking practices, media studies, modern Persian literature.

 

Gregory D. S. Anderson and Bikram JoraLiving Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages

            Dr. Greg Anderson is founder and president of Living Tongues Institute and an expert on Munda languages. Dr. Bikram Jora is South Asia Regional Coordinator for Living Tongues Institute. He is a native speaker of the Kherwarian Munda language Tamaria Mundari of Jharkhand, India. Anderson and Jora have been surveying Munda languages in Jharkhand, Odisha, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra for the past seven years.

 

Yeon-ju BaeUniversity of Michigan

            I’m a second year PhD student in linguistic anthropology at the University of Michigan. I hold a BA and MA in anthropology from Seoul National University, and my MA thesis is about speech genres and poetic structure of oral performance at a Korean Protestant church. For my doctoral research, I’m working on Korean Buddhist psychotherapy as a response to suicide and social suffering in South Korea.

 

Guadalupe Del Rosario BarrientosUniversity of Texas at Austin

            Guadalupe is a first year master’s degree candidate at the University of Texas at Austin in the Center for Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies. She received her bachelor’s degree from Swarthmore College in linguistics and languages with concentrations in Spanish and Russian. Her research and academic interests include Russian/Mexican transnational and comparative studies, Russian folklore and folk culture, foreign and second language acquisition, and translation studies.

 

Len BekéUniversity of New Mexico

            My research interests center on the Nuevomexicano Spanish dialect and community. I have been studying this variety since 2011 and have done fieldwork in many areas of the state including Albuquerque, Bernalillo, Santa Fe, Pecos and Abiquiú. Specific interests include contact induced language change, grammaticalization, language maintenance, linguistic repression, verbal art performance, and documentary & critical toponymy. I am currently working towards a Ph.D. in Hispanic Linguistics at the University of New Mexico.

 

Anna BelewUniversity of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

I am a PhD student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. My research focuses on language documentation, sociolinguistics, and language endangerment; my dissertation is a sociolinguistic documentation of Iyasa (Bantu A.30, Cameroon). I have been working with languages of Cameroon since 2008, and am interested in linguistic diversity and multilingualism in Africa in general.

 

Aris ClemonsUniversity of Texas at Austin

            Aris Clemons is a doctoral student in the Spanish and Portuguese department at UT Austin. She began her career as an ESL/Spanish teacher in Madrid, Spain. Returning to the U.S., she completed her MA in Linguistics at Syracuse University and continued her career as an educator and administrator at a Catholic school for low income students in Brooklyn, NY. Currently, she focuses on the intersection of language, race, and identity in educational contexts.

 

Stefan EngelbergInstitute for the German Language (Mannheim) & University of Mannheim

            Head of the department of Lexical Studies at the Institute for German Language in Mannheim since 2006; professor for German linguistics at the University of Mannheim since 2006; habilitation on the lexicon-grammar interface at the University of Wuppertal in 2005; PhD on verb semantics at the University of Wuppertal in 1998. Research on lexical semantics, argument structure, word formation, lexicography, language contact, language and colonialism.

 

Julia FineUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

            I am currently a graduate student in Linguistics at UC Santa Barbara. My research interests include prosody, style, affect and identity; language documentation and revitalization; and language, gender and (a)sexuality. I work primarily with the Kodiak Alutiiq language revitalization community in Kodiak, Alaska, and I am in the process of writing my master's thesis on the prosodic characteristics of constructed dialogue in Alutiiq storytelling.

 

Elianna GreenbergGeorgetown University

            Elianna Greenberg’s work focuses upon creating teaching methods that use linguistics and social politics to encourage interdisciplinary, culturally critical thinking among young learners. She earned her M.S. from Georgetown University, where she studied sociolinguistics, and her B.A.F.A. from The New School, where she studied discourse analysis and photography. Now an educator, Elie is pursuing a career in large-scale education reform, focusing on linguistic and cultural consciousness as a vehicle for change.

 

Rodney C. JubiladoUniversity of Hawaii at Hilo

            Rodney C Jubilado holds the degree of PhD in Theoretical Linguistics, and teaches at University of Hawaii. His research interests include theoretical linguistics, English in Southeast Asia, heritage education, migration, and Southeast Asian cultural studies. He has spoken at international conferences in Asia, Australia, and North America.  His professional society affiliation includes the Linguistic Society of America, Southeast Asian Linguistic Society, Association for Asian Studies, American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, etc.

 

Mary Kate KellyTulane University

Mary Kate Kelly is a PhD Candidate at Tulane University, studying the linguistics of Maya hieroglyphs. Her research looks at the linguistic variation present in the inscriptions, in order to gain better insight as to the distribution of different, but related, linguistic groups among the Maya. Her interests lie at the crossroads of language, literature, and culture, and extend to historical linguistics and the world’s writing systems.

 

Masha KhachaturyanUniversity of California, Berkeley

            Maria Khachaturyan is a visiting scholar in the Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley. Her primary interests lie in the fields of linguistic anthropology, linguistic documentation, (historical) syntax, and typology. Her main descriptive focus is Mano, a Mande language spoken in Guinea and Liberia. She has been doing fieldwork among the Mano people since 2009. In 2015 she published a grammar of Mano.

 

Shane LiefUniveristy of Michigan

 

Lindsay MorroneUniversity of New Mexico

            Lindsay Morrone is a PhD student in Linguistics at the University of New Mexico. Her research interests lie in typology, information structure, discourse analysis, and sociolinguistic variation within the local context of Albuquerque's LGBT community.

 

Isaac MuhandoTulane University

            Isaac Muhando is a language scholar from Kenya currently pursuing his PhD in Linguistics at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. He holds a masters degree in Linguistics and TESOL from Ball State University, Indiana. His primary research interests include Syntax and Morphology of Sheng, Lunyore focus marking, language contact, and multilingualism in urban areas.

 

Aisulu RaspayevaGeorgetown  University

Aisulu Raspayeva is a PhD candidate at the Department of Linguistics, Georgetown University. She is an international student from Kazakhstan, who is specializing in Sociolinguistics with a research focus on cross-cultural communication and national identity construction in modern Kazakhstan. She received her B.A. at Kazakh University of World Languages and M.A. in TESOL at WVU and has taught ESL/EFL for 7 years.

 

James SlottaUniversity of Texas at Austin

            James Slotta is a lecturer in the anthropology department at the University of Texas, Austin. His research focuses on the political significance of listening and communicative contact in both Papua New Guinea and North America.

 

Navdeep SokheyUniversity of Texas at Austin

            Navdeep Sokhey is a PhD student focusing on Arabic sociophonetics at UT Austin. She conducted research on the phenomenon of palatalization (namely of the alveolar nasal) & gendered identity in Cairene Arabic for her master’s thesis, and is currently undertaking comparative sociophonetic work on Cairene and Bahraini Arabic. She was a CASA and Fulbright fellow at the American University in Cairo, Egypt prior to beginning graduate studies at UT, and has additionally spent time living and observing Arabic dialects in Jordan and Bahrain.

 

Mark VisonàGeorgetown University

Mark is in his second year of coursework for a PhD concentration in sociolinguistics after spending six years in the Middle East (pursuing graduate studies in journalism and mass communication and working as a teacher). His current and past research interests include agenda-setting in social media, style-shifting via constructed dialogue, and discourse analysis of online content.

 

Anthony K. WebsterUniversity of Texas at Austin

            Anthony K. Webster is a linguistic anthropologist whose work focuses on Navajo ethnopoetics and verbal art. He is the author of Explorations in Navajo Poetry and Poetics (UNM Press, 2009) and Intimate Grammars: An Ethnography of Navajo Poetry (Arizona, 2015) as well as numerous articles on the language/culture/individual nexus, and with Paul Kroskrity, the editor of The Legacy of Dell Hymes: Ethnopoetics, Narrative Inequality, and Voice (IU Press, 2015).

 

Thea WilliamsonUniversity of Texas at Austin

            Thea Williamson is a doctoral candidate in the College of Education and Assistant Instructor in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing. A former high school English teacher and after-school program administrator, her research interests are teaching and learning reading and writing in culturally and linguistically diverse contexts, language ideology, and teacher education. She holds a B.A. in Spanish and Comparative Literature from Haverford College and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from UT Austin.

 

Acknowledgements

Sponsors: We would like to extend our gratitude to the following sponsors for SALSA XXV: College of Liberal Arts, Department of Linguistics, Department of Anthropology, Communication Studies, Native American and Indigenous Studies Initiative at UT Austin, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Department of English

 


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